About Jonathan Rotenberg

​In 1977, at age 13, Jonathan Rotenberg became an unlikely pioneer in the nascent personal computer industry.  In the library of his high school, he cofounded an organization to demystify personal computers called The Boston Computer Society. 



The BCS would become the world’s largest personal computer user organization.  It grew to more than 32,000 members in all 50 United States and 40 countries.  The Society became the leading international forum where personal computer companies unveiled groundbreaking new products and technologies to the public.  Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak made the first public presentation of the Macintosh at the BCS. Mitch Kapor introduced Lotus 1-2-3.  Dozens of industry leaders—from Bill Gates to Michael Dell, Nolan Bushnell to Ray Kurzweil, Seymour Papert to Dan Bricklin—came each month to connect with BCS members. The Society spawned more than a hundred user and special-interest subgroups, many of which became the largest of their kind in the world.  It also offered nearly a hundred educational programs each month and published over 20 publications.



By the time he was 21, Jonathan had been profiled in The Wall Street Journal (front page), PEOPLE, BusinessWeek, InfoWorldThe New York Times, The Boston Globe and TIME magazine, and on CBS Evening News.



The Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs named Jonathan one of the “Top 100 Young Entrepreneurs in America.”  Computer Reseller News named him “One of the 25 Most Influential Executives in the Personal Computer Industry.”  And SOAWorld and Slashdot named him one of the “Top 150 i-Technology Heroes of All Time.”



Today, Jonathan is a management consultant and executive coach who works with senior leaders of global companies to help them become more customer-centric.  He has an A.B. in Economics from Brown University; an MBA from Harvard Business School; and a Graduate Certificate in Executive Coaching from the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology.



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